Foundr Magazine Podcast | Learn From Successful Founders & Proven Entrepreneurs, The Ultimate StartUp Podcast For Business

Wil Schroter never set out to become an entrepreneur. In fact, he didn't have that much interest in business in the first place. But in 1995, he found himself in the office of his college guidance counselor saying that he was dropping out to start an internet company.

The question she asked wasn't why Schroter was quitting college, but what was this "internet" he was talking about.

A 19 years old, Schroter was one of the first handful of people in the world building successful businesses based on this world-changing piece of technology. While dropping out of college to pursue a career in entrepreneurship is pretty run-of-the-mill today, back in 1995 it was practically unheard of. Everyone around Schroter told him it was insane, that it'd be suicide, that he'd never make it.

Fast forward a little over 20 years, he now finds himself as the founder of several multimillion-dollar companies, including Fundable, the world's largest business crowdfunding platform, and the internationally renowned startup launchpad startups.co. It's been a successful journey since that guidance counselor's office.

Throughout his entrepreneurial career, Schroter has not only witnessed, but also participated in many of the world-changing impacts the internet has had. He's pretty much seen it all.

In this episode you will learn:

  • How to survive a business with less than zero business experience
  • The things you need to know on how to close more deals
  • Learn how to build a community
  • How to deal with growth pains effectively
  • Tips on what it takes to build a successful company
  • & more!
Direct download: FP123_Wil_Schroter.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:06am AEDT

After working in the children's media industry for over five years, there was something that was bothering Francesca Cavallo. She found herself asking the question: "Why does almost every princess in every classical fairy tale needs a prince to save her?"

It was something she didn't particularly care for. But the reality was that there just weren't that many fairy tales where the princess was the hero, and not just the damsel-in-distress. So Cavallo did what any other entrepreneur would do in her situation. If there wasn't a solution to the problem, then she was going to create one.

The result was a book called Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, a collection of 100 stories about great female artists, athletes, politicians, and scientists. Instead of hearing fairy tales like Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty, children everywhere could instead listen to the stories of extraordinary women like Frida Kahlo, Elizabeth the First, and Serena Williams.

In order to bring her idea into reality, Cavallo, co-founder of Timbuktu Labs, took to Kickstarter to reach her goal of $40,000 in order to print the first 1,000 copies.

The book was a smash hit. Within 24 hours, Cavallo's campaign raised half of its goal, and by the end of the month she had raised over $650,000 in funds and was the creator of the most successful publishing campaign in Kickstarter history.

It was a dream come true, but it was far from being a lucky break. Months before the campaign even started, Cavallo had begun planning. In our interview, she walks us through step-by-step how she engineered the massive success of one of the most successful crowdfunding campaigns to date.

In this episode you will learn:

  • How to validate your idea before you even try crowdfunding
  • Why the video is the most important part of any crowdfunding campaign
  • How to establish trust in both your campaign and yourself
  • The tools you can use to ensure your campaign's success
  • Step-by-step instructions for what to do before, during, and after your crowdfunding campaign
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP122_Francesca_Cavallo.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:47am AEDT

A unique product snags attention. A boring product does not.

Brad Munro says crowdfunding is most successful when you have the former—something innovative like Willi Footwear’s improved flip flops.

“The kind of people that are contributing to your crowdfunding campaign, especially if they’re buying a product, they’re doing so because they can’t buy it anywhere else,” he says. “They’re not going to jump on and grab something that they can go down to the shop and get, that’s just as good or the exact same thing.”

But they didn't rely on their product's uniqueness. By shoveling time into their campaign, both the preparation and execution, the team at Willi Footwear was able to integrate consistent messaging with outreach to people they knew, which earned them the money they needed to ensure the success of their fledgling company.

In this episode you will learn:

  • Why Indiegogo might be a better platform for crowdfunders
  • How to strike the right tone for your campaign video
  • What connections you can immediately leverage to ensure your campaign is a success
  • The elements behind a high-converting project page
  • What you need to start planning for once you decide to start crowdfunding
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP121_Brad_Munro.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:11am AEDT

Thirty years ago, Michael Gerber released a book called The E-Myth: Why Most Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About it.

It carried within it lessons on what it means to be an entrepreneur, the importance of systems in building a scalable business, even the different types of people who start their own businesses. It laid out the common pitfalls that happen to most novice entrepreneurs and gave practical advice on how to avoid them.

The best-selling book has since inspired millions of people to start their own businesses, and is still considered to be a must-read for entrepreneurs everywhere. Startup thought leaders like Tim Ferriss and Seth Godin have heaped praise on the lessons outlined in this book.

But before Gerber began changing the lives of a whole generation of business owners, he explains, he never intended to become an entrepreneur. It was only through a chance meeting with a distraught business owner that Gerber found himself with his first client and in the position to help someone grow a business.

"I discovered something I'd never known before, and that is the conclusion I've come to over the years—that despite the obvious differences between industries, between vertical markets, between kinds of companies, what I began to discover was that from a business development perspective, they're not different at all."

Despite all the technological changes that have happened since that first client, Gerber asserts that the key principles behind building a business have remained the same.

In this episode you will learn:

  • What exactly it is that makes an entrepreneur different from everyone else
  • How to be a dreamer, a thinker, a storyteller, and a leader
  • The difference between strategic and tactical thinking, and which one you should be doing
  • Why everyone should start thinking about building a business
  • How to make your business unique, even if your product isn't
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP120_Michael_Gerber.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:16am AEDT

Simon Griffiths sat down for what he believed in and, it turned out, parking it on a toilet was an epic marketing win for a good cause.

Griffiths and the team behind Who Gives a Crap toilet paper employed a clever stunt in which they livestreamed their co-founder sitting on a toilet until they reached their crowdfunding goal, and it worked. The company gives half of its profits to charity to increase access to toilets and sanitation in developing countries.

But it takes more than a good cause and a good marketing ploy to have a successful crowdfunding campaign. The team also relied on thorough preparation and consistent messaging to blow away their goal.

Griffiths and his co-founder Jehan Ratnatunga did a first take on their video in January 2012, hoping to launch soon after. But they realized that it wasn’t quite what they wanted, so they went back and tried again, even taking the time to get advice from an ad firm in Melbourne.

The video wasn’t the only thing they had to prepare. The team wanted to be sure that their campaign would be a coherent, quality whole, and if that meant delaying the launch so that they would have time to refine things, that was OK.

“We thought we’d go live in February or March, and then it just kept on getting continuously pushed back, and then it wasn’t until July that the campaign did go live,” Griffiths says.

They were only working on the campaign part-time during the preparation phase, and it ended up taking six months for all of their ideas to come together in a way that they were happy with. Preparing an effective campaign isn’t like heating up a microwave dinner. It’s more like cooking a multi-course feast. It takes time.

In this episode you will learn:

  • What makes your campaign newsworthy and why people should care
  • How to make your campaign as shareable as possible
  • Why the first 24 hours are the most important in any crowdfunding campaign
  • Kickstarter or Indiegogo. How to pick the one that works for you
  • How to keep your message consistent across every media channels
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP119_Simon_Griff.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:38pm AEDT

The Canary team didn’t start their company with crowdfunding. In fact, they had been working on the idea for roughly a year before turning to Indiegogo.

“We decided that crowdfunding would be a great way for us to validate the market a little bit,” says Jon Troutman, co-founder of the company, which offers networked home security systems.

It took the team about a month and a half to plan and prepare the campaign, but Troutman notes that they had already developed a voice for their brand and a story for their product. They didn’t devote as much time to preparation as some campaigns because they could already picture the puzzle. They just had to fit the pieces together.

And getting users involved in the process would be key to doing so. After working on Canary for a whole year, they needed an outside view. “What we’re building is so much about filling a need for people, that it felt weird to go too far into product development without bringing more people into the process,” Troutman says.

One of the great things about crowdfunding is that it lets the market decide in real time whether or not to validate your idea. In Canary’s case, it did.

In this episode you will learn:

  • The right way to communicate your message to your audience
  • Where to go when you're looking for expert help
  • How to analyse the competition and what you can learn from doing so
  • What questions you need to ask yourself before you launch your campaign
  • How much time you need to devote to your campaign in order for it to be successful
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP118_Jon_Troutman.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:59am AEDT

A team of doctors and engineers wanted a safer alternative to Q-Tips, so they created it. By understanding where potential users were coming from and staying on point with the idea that their product could alleviate those pains, the Oto-Tip gained the funding it needed to go big.

The lesson from Oto-Tip is, before you start any crowdfunding campaign, you must know how your project will improve people’s lives, and you must explain it in a way that resonates emotionally with potential backers. In this week's episode, Lily Truong, co-founder of Oto-Tip and manager of its crowdfunding campaign, explains how they did it.

“My key question I wanted to ask myself was … ‘Why would someone need this? Why would backers resonate with the story? What pain point are you really solving?’” Crowdfunding campaigns can reach their goals when they offer a clear way to deal with common struggles people experience.

In the case of Truong’s campaign, Q-tips, cotton swabs, ear sticks, they all shove wax deeper into your ear, make you itch, and can even puncture your eardrum. The Oto-Tip offers another, far less irritating approach to earwax.

It all goes back to that pitch: Look, there’s a problem, but here’s a way to fix it. Find out how your own campaign can tap into people’s emotions and offer a solution.

In this episode you will learn:

  • The importance of getting feedback before you even entertain the thought of crowdfunding something
  • How to figure out the best media platforms to reach your audience
  • Why you need a strong story and how to create one that works for you
  • The good, the bad, and the ugly when working with PR firms
  • Awesome hacks you can do with LinkedIn to boost your Kickstarter campaign
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP117_Lily_Truong.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:26am AEDT

The problem Eskil Nordhaug wanted to solve for people was simple. Videos taken with smartphones or small cameras are notoriously shaky.

So he simply looked at the needs. He asked himself what it would take to build a company selling a mechanical video stabilizer that exceeded expectations—the kind of product consumers needed, the amount of money he would need, the coverage help press outlets needed, the info his project page would need. 

The result was StayblCam, and it was precisely this needs-focused approach that led to a smash-hit Kickstarter campaign and the successful company that followed.

Nordhaug says that the same principle can guide the way for any great crowdfunding campaign. “The most successful ones, generally speaking, are the ones that, there’s a need for it,” he says. “It solves a problem. It’s not just some fancy, weird thing that’s made for the sake of being made.”

Crowdfunding appeals to ordinary people with limited funds, so they can’t back every project that breezes by. When people see your product, you don’t want them to shrug and think it’s neat. You want them to whip out their credit card and ask, “When can I get one?” If your product solves a problem that’s long-pestered people, they’re likely to do that.

Don’t make something that people will want in on—make something that people need in on. Nordhaug shared with Foundr this golden piece of advice, and so many more related to running a successful fundraising campaign.

“It’s about creating value for users,” Nordhaug says.

In this episode you will learn:

  • Why you need to start working on your campaign months before you even launch
  • The correct way to figure out what funding goal you should aim for
  • The best way to contact press outlets and start getting media mentions
  • Paids ads. How and why you should use them
  • What a great Kickstarter landing page looks like
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP116_Eskil_Nordhaug.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:57am AEDT

There's a common thread in a lot of entrepreneurs' stories: They were facing a problem, couldn't find the solution they were looking for, so went ahead and built it themselves.

That's exactly what Derek Flanzraich did when he started Greatist, a digital media startup that's all about health and fitness, without all the fluff and in-your-face marketing. As someone who has struggled with his weight his entire life, Flanzraich wanted to find a brand that would talk to him on a personal level and not as another client.

Frustrated by the fact that the world was becoming more health conscious, yet at the time seemed to be more interested in shaming those who wanted to get in shape, Flanzraich set out to stake his own claim in an oversaturated market. The key difference, though, was that instead of making his audience feel bad, he would make them feel welcome.

"It wasn't actually about the quality of what we're doing, which we felt that was gonna be best in class or whatever. It was actually the voice that really stuck out," Flanzraich says.

It was a simple change in language, but its message connected with an underserved audience that would eventually translate into 10 million unique visitors every month.

In an era where it seems like every media company is striving for page views above all else, and pumping out nothing but clickbait articles with little substance in order to attract them, Greatist takes a different approach.

"We don't think quantity is a metric that matters. Just like I don't think, increasingly, uniques and page views is a metric that matters. All of these things can be gained and aren't inherently valuable on their own," he says.

Greatist is now one of the world's most trusted brands when it comes to anything about health, fitness, and happiness. It's commitment to keeping a friendly and personal tone in all of its content has resonated with millennials throughout the world. With such a commitment to quality over quantity over everything else, Flanzraich has built from the ground up the kind of branding and engagement that most companies would kill for.

In this episode you will learn:

  • Why you'll never be ready to be an entrepreneur, and why that's okay
  • How to find a voice and tone that resonates with your audience
  • How to calculate your long-term brand value
  • Flanzraich's unique approach to content and how it holds up against the SEO-focused practices of others
  • What it means to build a powerhouse brand and how to do it
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP115_Derek_Flanzraich.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:43am AEDT

When you think about wine, you most likely imagine stern-faced sommeliers, or parties where tuxedos and hors d'oeuvres on silver platters are the norm.

Michael Houlihan and Bonnie Harvey do not fit the stereotype. You probably wouldn't even expect them to be wine-lovers, let alone the co-founders of Barefoot Wine, the largest wine brand in the world. But according to them, the reason they're so successful is precisely because they knew nothing about the industry going in.

Houlihan and Harvey never planned on going into the wine business, but when the opportunity presented itself, they jumped on it.

"If we had known then what we know now, there would be no Barefoot Wine. It's now the largest wine brand in the world, but it would not exist if we had a clue," Houlihan says.

Not having a clue turned out to be their secret ingredient. Instead of being influenced by years of tradition and trying to fit the mold of the wine industry, they decided to do something different and make wine fun and accessible to the average person.

Despite the backlash and criticism they received, despite the fact that they had no established brand or marketing presence, they found a strategy that led them to become one of the fastest-growing wine brands in the nation. To make it even more impressive, it was all achieved without paid advertising.

"It was by contributing to the community, by supporting the same issues that our shoppers were interested in, that we were able to sell our product. Because we weren't paying for advertising, this became our form of advertising. It's what we called 'Worthy Cause Marketing,' and that's what we used throughout the nation when we started to spread the word and grow and expand," Harvey says.

Barefoot Wine has come a long way since its inception in 1986, when Houlihan and Harvey naively thought they would make a profit within four years. Now they're a little older and a little wiser, but they still possess that lively spark that led them to create one of the most popular wine brands in the world.

In this episode, you will learn:

  • Why ignorance and naiveté might be your strongest weapons in disrupting an industry
  • What "Worthy Cause Marketing" is and how you can use it to build your brand
  • The painful lessons in logistics and distribution Houlihan and Harvey had to learn from selling a physical product
  • Where to go to learn the lessons you need to succeed
  • How to stay true to your vision and not let anyone else hold you back
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP114_Michael_Houlihan.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:28am AEDT

When Zipcar first started it was nothing more than a green Volkswagen beetle named "Betsy." It was parked outside of Robin Chase's house and the key was hidden underneath a pillow on her porch. Inside the glove box was a piece of paper where you would write down the time you rented the car and the time you brought it back. That was it.

These days, Zipcar is the largest car sharing service in the world, with more than 13,000 cars spread across almost every major city in the world.

The first time Chase encountered her idea with Zipcar was when her co-founder came back from a vacation in Berlin. Among her many stories about her vacation, she told Chase about a peculiar business she had witnessed where she saw multiple people sharing a single car. Taken with the idea, Chase immediately began setting out to build a better version.

"It's an idea that we didn't even invent. We just executed it way better than other people," Chase says.

Zipcar launched within six months, with a founder who was a mother of three and had no technical experience. It was 1996, when the internet was still new and very different from what we know today. Nevertheless, Chase was determined to make her startup a reality.

We had the pleasure to speak with Robin Chase about her incredible journey as an entrepreneur, a disruptor and a world-changer, and all the lessons she learned in her inspiring career.

In this interview, you will learn:

  • What it means to create a true minimum viable product to validate your idea
  • Why the best ideas come from solving your own problems
  • Advice on who to hire when you're a struggling startup
  • What qualities you should be looking for when bringing in new people to your team
  • The importance of user feedback and always listening to your customer
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP113_Robin_Chase.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:42am AEDT

Casey Fenton, like many of us in our 20s, wasn't entirely sure where he would go in life.

Growing up in a small town in Maine, he started to think about this entire world that existed beyond the borders of his hometown, and all the experiences he had yet to have. One thing he knew for sure was that his small hometown wasn't going to be offering him any of the new experiences he was looking for.

"That got me to start buying random plane tickets to anywhere in the world," he says.

From there it was traveling from place to place, mingling with locals and getting a backstage pass to the world's greatest cities. It was then that Fenton formed an idea for a business that would end up spanning the globe.

Today, Couchsurfing.com has more than 10 million members in over 20,000 cities around the world. When it launched in 2003, Couchsurfing was a revolutionary concept. It was one of the first businesses to truly harness the power of a sharing economy. Instead of spending money at hotels and backpacker hostels, travelers were instead offered a choice to stay in the homes of hospitable locals free of charge.

Since then, Fenton's business model has been replicated a thousand times over by the likes of Uber and Airbnb, just to name a few.

We had the chance to talk with Fenton about his entrepreneurial journey, starting with being a backpacker to becoming the founder of a multimillion-dollar company with a reach that spans every corner of the globe.

In this interview you'll learn:

  • How to go through the hardships of starting your own business
  • How to figure out which tasks to delegate and which tasks you need to prioritize as a leader
  • Tips on creating and maintaining a massive and engaged community
  • How to build an international reputation that people trust
  • The most powerful drivers that'll get you to scale your business
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP112_Casey_Fenton.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:44am AEDT

For most entrepreneurs, the real test isn't whether or not you can grow a successful business, but how well you can bounce back from failure. For some, this will prove to be too much and they'll hang up the gloves and never try again. For the true entrepreneurs, though, they'll find a way to jump back into the ring no matter what.

That is exactly what Eugene Woo, co-founder of Venngage, did.

“I had like a taste of failure, but I still went ahead anyway and did it again,” Woo says.

After his first startup went under, Woo found himself back in the corporate world feeling like a failure. Despite it all though, he dusted himself off, took it all as a learning experience and refused to give up.

Armed with nothing but a nagging idea about helping job applicants by turning their resumes into beautiful infographics, Woo went ahead and pitched his idea at Startup Weekend in Toronto and, to his surprise, he won. One thing led to another and he found himself quitting his job once again to work on his startup full time.

The startup known as Visiualize.me blew up, getting featured in places like Mashable and Tech Crunch and gaining more than 200,000 signups before the product was even properly released.

But, once again, it was anything but smooth sailing for Woo.

“I made a lot of the classic mistakes. One of the main ones was I started a company with people I didn’t know very well.”

Within a few months, founders started leaving the company, with one even refusing to turn up to an interview with Y Combinator and leaving shortly after. Stung by failure again, Woo didn't know what to do and ended up selling his company. Despite it all, he knew he had a good idea on his hands. He charged right back into the startup world, this time with Venngage, a tool that allows you to easily make your own infographics, and armed with lessons he learned from his previous failures, he was determined to make Venngage a success.

Today, Venngage has tripled in size with over a thousand new leads to their site every day, and over half a million users per month.

We talk with Woo about the invaluable lessons he learned on his journey to success and ask him to share his best advice on how entrepreneurs can overcome their fear of failure, and the best marketing tactics to quickly grow your startup.

In this episode you will learn:

  • How to know when to give up or keep on going with your startup
  • Why so many startups are doing content marketing wrong
  • The secret to getting your company to start ranking high in SEO as soon as possible
  • How and why you should do blogger outreach
  • What the most important metrics are for growing your brand's exposure and visibility
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP111_Eugene_Woo.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:28pm AEDT

Every morning of every day, Sujan Patel starts his day by getting out all of his creative energy onto paper.

The process is relatively simple. He starts by recording himself talking about whatever topic he wants to write about as a way to order his thoughts. He'll then send this recording to a transcriptionist and when he gets it back he'll spend around an hour cranking out a 1,500-2,000 word blog post. For Sujan, this is the secret to being one of the world's best and most prolific content marketers today.

Just 10 years ago, content marketing just wasn't a thing. Sure, blogs existed but they were rarely used in marketing. Today, content marketing is one of the go-to strategies for businesses everywhere. But with everyone eagerly jumping onto the content marketing bandwagon, simply having a high-quality blog just doesn't cut it anymore.

In order to really harness the power of content marketing and see some tangible results, you're going to need a little out-of-the-box thinking.

"Everyone's writing content for their customers, their existing customers, or who they think their customers are. What I like to do is, I don't even talk about any of that stuff. I talk about content circles. And what a content circles is, is [the] content that circles your industry."

As the founder of ContentMarketer.io, the ultimate tool for content marketers, Sujan is one of the most knowledgable people around, and he shared a ton of his wisdom on the subject with us.

In this week's episode you will learn:

  • The best way to generate ideas for articles that your audience will love
  • Just why content marketing is so powerful and why everyone is using it
  • How to create content that generates you leads and customers
  • What to do when you find yourself with writer's block
  • How you too can start writing for places like Forbes, Inc. and Fast Company
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP110_Sujan_Patel.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:17am AEDT

During a creative career filled with awards and recognition, it took Alex Bogusky a while to realize that none of it mattered unless he loved the work.

“You could win the Grand Prix at Cannes—the next day you’re going to go into your office and look at the same dude across the office and try to think of something. It doesn’t feel any better; it didn’t make you any smarter; it doesn’t make anything any easier,” Bogusky says.

He did, in fact, win the most prestigious award at Cannes Advertising. Actually, under his leadership, the firm Crispin Porter + Bogusky won in all five categories, and became the world’s most awarded advertising agency. Bogusky himself was named Creative Director of the Decade by Adweek magazine, and Fast Company has called him both the Steve Jobs and the Elvis of advertising.

Looking over his many endeavors, Bogusky is a hard person to pin down. There’s a friendly, surfery quality about him, but he’s also gained a reputation as a perfectionist and ferocious supervisor. He’s worked for both car companies and Al Gore’s climate change initiative. He’s overseen iconic ad campaigns for junk food, and the most successful youth-focused anti-smoking campaign in U.S. history. Having left the agency six years ago, he’s now focusing on work with a social responsibility component, supporting multiple creative agencies and a startup accelerator.

But for all of the goals he’s achieved, Bogusky says the happiness he’s found in his career comes from loving the journey—that practice of sitting down with other people and thinking really hard to solve a problem.

“I’ve found that I had to learn to love the process and forget all the goals. Because the goals, as you achieved them, they didn’t really change anything.”

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to embrace change and use it to fuel your creativity
  • Why you need to listen to voices outside your startup and what it could mean for you
  • When and where advertising and branding comes in for a business
  • How to find opportunities to upset the status quo
  • How you can start loving the journey regardless of its highs and lows
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP109_Alex_Bogusky.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:46am AEDT

The future of media, if not the present, probably looks a lot like The Next Web, which is odd considering co-founder Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten says it’s not even really a media company.

The Next Web instead thinks of itself as a tech company, firing on multiple cylinders at once, including international conferences, ecommerce, online courses, and of course, one of the most influential and trafficked news sites on the web. Soon they’re even opening up a brick and mortar space in Amsterdam that will serve as hub for technology startups.

“For some people it’s sort of weird, ‘What, you’ve got a conference and a website and now you’re opening a space? That’s a totally different thing,’” Veldhuijzen van Zanten told Foundr (we’ll just call him Boris from now on).

“For us, it’s a logical next step, instead of losing focus or branching out into different areas. They’re all connected by the brand and a curiosity in technology and the future of technology.”

The Next Web actually started as a conference host. Its annual event in Amsterdam draws some 20,000 international attendees.

However, the company is probably best known for its tech news site. That branch of the business is staggering, drawing up to 8 million visitors a month. But with its conferences expanding, its growing online marketplace, and Boris and his partners always looking for the next opportunity, the most impressive thing about The Next Web is how it merges such a wide range of services to meet the needs of its loyal community. And they do it all with a relatively small staff and a squad of remote contributors.

“Everything is part of a circle that is growing stronger over time,” Boris says. “Part of our revenue comes from advertising on the sites with all the traffic we have, an important part is the conference, and now the ecommerce part is growing stronger.”

Next could be research, consulting, video, anything within reason that the people who have come to love and trust the company might want. And that’s the secret to The Next Web’s success. It’s not a company that makes a product—it’s a network of people.

In this interview you will learn:

  • The subtle details behind what makes a great event that everyone loves
  • How to conduct the best interviews with notable influencers
  • Boris's number one tip on generating amazing content
  • The tools that every startup should start using
  • The key to keeping everyone in your company aligned to the same vision
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP108_Boris_Veldhuijzen_van_Zanten.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:27am AEDT

No one ever "gives" an entrepreneur a job, they make one for themselves.

Entrepreneurs don't ask for permission, they just do. And no one exemplifies this better than Ryan Holiday who has made an entire career out of refusing to play by the rules.

As a writer he started off by dropping out of college to apprentice under Robert Greene as a research assistant. To date he's published 5 bestselling books, his first book now being taught in colleges around the world. As a marketer he got his first job as the Director of Marketing at American Apparel by starting off as a marketing consultant and catching the eye of founder Dov Charney.

Today, he works as a world-renowned media strategist he can count among his list of clients the likes of Tim Ferriss, Tucker Max and Linkin Park just to name a few. So how did he manage to achieve so much all before turning 30?

For Holiday it's a mastery of two things: the media and your own self-development.

"I found that the more that I go out and learn stuff on my own, the more opportunities I create through me, then the better I am at my job," he said.

We speak with Ryan as where we talk everything from his process to media strategy to his advice on how to always keep learning in order to be successful.

In this episode you will learn:

  • The secret to getting driving attention to your business with social proof
  • How to pitch journalists, bloggers and reports from major media channels
  • The importance of self-reflection and humility in order to succeed
  • What works and doesn't work when it comes to successful PR
  • Where to go and what to do when you need a mentor
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP107_Ryan_Holiday.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:41am AEDT

In 2012 James Beshara and his co-founder officially launched Tilt, a platform that aimed to make crowdfunding not only more personal but to make the process as easy as possible. But if you ask the Y-Combinator alum himself, he'll say that Tilt was created years before it even launched.

Originally starting off as an offshoot of an earlier startup that he was working on, he soon found himself working on Tilt more and more. It was then he realised he was onto something.

"For every young entrepreneur out there, starting, or building, or founding something. It always sounds like it just starts one day in February or starts one afternoon when you get hit with inspiration. When in truth I think it is the amalgamation of just always starting things, doing things, trying out ideas and one of them just starts to get pulled from you, and you start to spend more time on it."

Ever since it's inception Tilt has been on a tear.

In just four short years Tilt is now valued at $500 million and has crowdfunded some of the world's most memorable campaigns in recent memory. Like sending the Jamaican bobsled team to the Sochi Olympics to raising over $180 thousand for several campaigns providing relief to the victims of Hurricane Sandy.

Along the way though James has learnt some very valuable lessons on what it means to be the CEO and co-founder of a fast-growing startup. We chat with James today and he reveals his personal methods and strategies on how to build a startup that not only scales, but scales quick.

 

In this episode you will learn:

  • The importance of waiting for the right co-founder
  • How to get out of your own head and move fast, all while developing the best product possible
  • Why the smartest people in the room might not necessarily give you the best advice
  • How to design and build a product to grow as fast as possible
  • The two key things every entrepreneurs needs to focus on if they want to succeed
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP106_James_Beshara.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:35pm AEDT

Something that most entrepreneurs struggle with the most is coming up with an idea for a startup. They'll study business forecasts and look at unique trends trying to find the next big thing. What most entrepreneurs forget though is that the most disruptive startups in the world were created to solve a single problem.

Which is what exactly Polina Raygorodskaya was looking to do when she founded Wanderu, a platform that allows you to find, compare and book bus and train tickets anywhere within the United States. In just 4 years Wanderu have grown their database to over 5 million users. It turns out there were other people that were facing the same problem as Polina.

A long time entrepreneur Polina came across the idea for WanderU while constantly commuting back and forth in New York. Often having to travel by bus or train she quickly found out, to her surprise, that there was no single database to allow commuters to easily find and book bus and train tickets.

Sensing a startup opportunity she closed down her PR firm and began to build Wanderu.

Despite having little experience in the travel industry Polina was undeterred and together with her co-founder they built North America's leading ground travel search platform. Today, Wanderu is now partnered and works together with the leaders of their industry like Greyhound, Megabus, and Peter Pan Bus just to name a few.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Tips on how to get started in the travel industry, even if you don't have any experience
  • Importance of finding the right team that shares your vision
  • How to find and connect with the best advisers and influencers to help you build your startup
  • When to sacrifice profit for growth
  • Secrets to creating a valuable network that'll sustain your business in the long run
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP105_Polina_Raygorodskaya.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:11pm AEDT

There are no shortcuts when it comes to good online marketing, something that Dave Hobson knows all too well.

As the resident expert on all things marketing at Foundr we give you a very special episode today about Dave from how he came to be at Foundr to his thoughts on successful online marketing.

Funnily enough, it is entirely possible that Foundr would not be around if Dave had not cold-called Nathan nearly four years ago. At the time Nathan had only just started Foundr and Dave was at a job where he had to cold-call people and try to make a sale over the phone. Instead of making the sale the founder of Foundr and Dave got to chatting and they eventually became friends.

In order to understand why Foundr may have never existed without Dave Hobson you first must understand his role at Foundr. Essentially he's Nathan right-hand man, the go-to guy whenever a discussion needs to be had about marketing, strategy or the future of Foundr. Even before he started officially working at Foundr, Dave has always been in the background helping Foundr out with his advice.

Today we're very lucky to count him as one of our own and as Foundr's Business Development and Product manager.

In today's episode we show you a little of what's going on behind-the-scenes at Foundr, but more importantly we have Dave divulge the tactics and strategies behind one of our best sale channels: webinars.

Webinars are an amazing tool and they've become a staple in the online marketing world and no one knows that better than Dave Hobson, who knows all the ins and out behind what makes a successful webinar.

In this episode you will learn:

  • Dave's story and how he came to work at Foundr
  • Why webinars are so powerful and why almost every business in the world can use them
  • All the tools you'll need to start doing a successful webinar
  • The structure every great webinar needs if you want to make sales
  • How to choose the right webinar topic for you and your audience
  • & much more!

If you want to learn more about webinars, then check out our FREE guide on webinars at https://foundrmag.com/webinarguide!!

Direct download: FP104_Dave_Hobson.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am AEDT

The term "unicorn company" describes a startup valued at over $1 billion that managed to get there in a relatively short period of time. Usually when we talk about unicorn companies, we're dealing with Silicon Valley and the cutting edge of the tech scene. Companies that are disruptive in the sense that they've created something totally new.

Rarely, however, do we find a unicorn company that started out in an overcrowded and declining market. Yet somehow, despite the odds, Tom Bilyeu, co-founder of Quest Nutrition, turned a fledgling startup into a powerhouse in just six years.

When Quest Nutrition first hit the scene with their protein bars, they were told by almost every expert in the space that it was insane and that it was guaranteed to fail. Yet Bilyeu and his co-founders persevered and tackled the problem in a way that no one else had thought of before.

First they focused on their customers, to empower them and actually help them make healthy and positive changes in their lives. In short, they treated their customers differently than their competitors.

The result was explosive, growing by 57,000% in their first three years and cracking the $1 billion mark three years later.

We were lucky to sit down with Bilyeu and have him give us the breakdown and strategy behind Quest Nutrition and how they became the unicorn company they are today.

In this interview you will learn:

  • The challenges of managing a hyper-growth company and how to overcome them
  • How to navigate the classic entrepreneurial debate of profit vs. growth
  • Why you need to evangelize to your customer whenever you can
  • How to build brand loyalty and have your audience believe in your vision
  • How to crack the notoriously difficult and crowded health and nutrition market
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP103_Tom_Bilyeu.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:33am AEDT

When Hal Elrod was 19 he was involved in a car accident with a drunk driver that left him with brain damage, 11 broken bones, and doctors telling him that he'd never walk again. While many people would understandably give into grief or anger or any other whirlwind of emotions that come after such a traumatic event, Elrod instead made the conscious choice to be at peace with himself.

He knew there was nothing he could control about his situation, but he could control how the situation affected him. While he accepted the fact that he might never be able to use his legs again and was at peace with it, he was also determined to find a way to walk again.

“I’m going accept the worst-case scenario, while I focus on the best case scenario.”

Three weeks later, defying all odds and expectations, he began to walk again.

Since then, he's called upon his life story and lessons he's learned along the way to become a highly sought-after motivational speaker and bestselling author of the book The Miracle Morning. Through his book, Elrod has touched the lives of millions of people with his simple philosophy and has guided them to become more productive, happier, less stressed, and at peace with themselves.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How you too can start becoming a better entrepreneur, and a better person overall, every single morning
  • Why the most successful people in the world take their mornings very seriously
  • When to accept the worst and how to turn that into a weapon
  • What your potential is and how to reach it
  • What it truly means to put mind over matter and how to do it
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP102_Hal_Elrod.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:21am AEDT

Brian Scudamore of O2E brands knew all along that he wanted to be an entrepreneur. Relying on that sense of determination, he's built up a sprawling multimillion-dollar business empire, with franchises all over the world. But it all began with junk.

To be specific, it all started in a McDonalds drive-thru, with Scudamore sitting in his car trying to figure out how he would pay for college. What he saw was an old pick-up truck filled to the brim with junk, and he immediately knew that this would be his ticket to chase his entrepreneurial dream.

"A week later, I had a business hauling away junk, and that was the way into my job and a career path that's now been 27 years of pure entrepreneurial passion," he says.

The first business he founded was 1-800-Got-Junk, which has since turned into multiple franchises all around the world and spun off into three more business in the home services niche. Altogether they generate a revenue of $250 million per year!

But it hasn't been smooth sailing over the past 27 years, with many ups and downs along the way and some valuable lessons learned. We're very lucky to learn those lessons directly from Brian today through this week's podcast episode.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to get your first round of customers within your first day of business
  • The secrets to building a successful international franchise
  • What the franchise business model looks like and how you can make it work for you
  • Why you need to always hire for culture and fit rather than skill
  • Traps and pitfalls to look out for when running such a large international conglomerate
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP101_Brian_Scudamore.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:59pm AEDT

On November 9, 2013, I  released the first episode of the Foundr Podcast. It was with Fabio Rosati, then-CEO of Elance. To be completely honest, I wasn't quite sure what I was trying to achieve by releasing a podcast. At the time, it was just another way for us to give to our community, by releasing the audio of our interviews for free.

Fast-forward to today and I can't believe we're at our 100th episode! It's flown by and so much has changed since. But the entire time I've kept in mind this piece of advice from my friend Daniel DiPiazza:

"Keep producing content on a consistent basis every single week, keep getting next-level epic interviews, and people will come.”

He was totally right. In the years since that first episode, we've managed to become one of the top 10 podcasts for business, we have over 70,000 downloads a month, and it's done wonders for our business.

So to mark this occasion, we decided to do something a little different in this episode. Instead of me asking all the questions, I'll be the one getting interviewed for a change! My good friend Dan Norris of WP Curve took over as host, and we took a look back at how Foundr started three years ago and how far we've come since then.

I'm going to share with you the story behind Foundr, how it all started, and the strategies I used to start the company on the path it's on today. I also took a crack at some predictions about where we'll be by our 200th episode.

In this interview you will learn:

  • The story behind Foundr and how it all started
  • Who my biggest sources of inspiration are and how they shaped Foundr's vision
  • My strategy for pitching and landing interviews with the best entrepreneurs in the world
  • Why you need to focus on design if you want to be successful
  • What's going on behind-the-scenes at Foundr and what's coming next!
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP100_Nathan_Interview.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:31pm AEDT

As much as entrepreneurs can go on extolling the virtues of a great marketing strategy or knowing your target customer, at the end of the day, it's all about having something worth selling. No matter how great your advertising campaign may be, if you don't have something that people want to buy then you simply don't have a business.

And yet, entrepreneurs all too often tend to gloss over this fact. They'll focus on everything else, but somehow forget to question whether or not their product is a winner, or even if it's a good idea in the first place.

This is where Janna Bastow of ProdPad steps in, because she, more than anyone else in the world, knows exactly why effective product management is so instrumental to your startup's success.

For Bastow, effective product management is when you're able to find that delicate balance between what's technically feasible, valuable for the customer, and profitable for the business, and define a roadmap on that basis.

Ever since launching ProdPad in 2012, a tool that lets startup teams formally gather ideas, pick out the best ones and turn them into profitable products, Bastow has helped hundreds of startups and entrepreneurs in finding out what their perfect product is. More than anyone else, she knows how just difficult this process can be and why you shouldn't take it for granted.

In this interview you will learn:

  • What a product manager is and why you need one as part of your startup
  • The best way to talk to customers and figure out what they actually want
  • Step-by-step instructions on how to design a product roadmap
  • Why you need a user story and what it means
  • How to manage a remote team as a bootstrapped startup
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP099_Janna_Bastow.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:37am AEDT

Today you might recognize Robert Herjavec as "the nice shark" on ABC's Shark Tank. With a pleasant smile and a reassuring tone of voice, he may seem like an odd fit in the highly competitive world of business and investing.

But don't let that fool you, because behind those kind eyes lies a strength of character and iron will that every great entrepreneur needs to achieve success.

When Herjavec was a young man, he actually wanted to be a filmmaker. In fact, he was a producer for the Winter Olympics in Canada in 1984 while only 22 years old. It was a promising start to his dream of moving to Hollywood and becoming a big-time director. The trouble was, no one was hiring.

With a degree in English literature, a passion for filmmaking, and zero experience or knowledge in computer science, it might seem odd that he would eventually go on to found the Herjavec Group in 2003, one of the top cybersecurity firms in the world. The company grew from $400K to a whopping $140 million in sales annually in just over 12 years.

So how did he do it?

He literally called up the head of the company and, despite having no background in the field whatsoever, offered to work for them for free. With nothing but grit he managed to work his way up the ladder and, despite some setbacks here and there, become the success story he is today.

When not focusing on his own business, Herjavec is all about buying, selling, investing and building great startups, subjects we were very lucky to talk to him about.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Tips and advice from the Shark himself on how to pitch to potential investors
  • Different ways to build a company culture that's always striving for greatness
  • How to scale your business quickly without sacrificing quality
  • What goes into selling and how to create a story that will get people hooked
  • Why you need to focus on growth as a business
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP098_Robert_Herjavec.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:43am AEDT

When you think of the word "entrepreneur," the image you're likely to conjure up in your head is one of a fast-talking, brash millennial with personality and ego to spare. That's exactly the kind of entrepreneur Nathan Latka is.

At only 26 years old, Latka has managed to do more in five years as an entrepreneur than most people double his age!

While there may be entrepreneurs out there who wring their hands and refuse to make a move until everything is perfect, Latka instead drives forward like a runaway train and grabs each and every opportunity that comes his way.

This attitude is perfectly showcased when, as a college student, Latka began his first multimillion-dollar business in his dorm room ... while in his underwear. Despite knowing nothing about coding, he began cold-calling and began pre-selling Facebook fan pages at $7,000 a pop. When it came time to deliver the goods he took to YouTube, taught himself everything he needed to know, and started making money.

Before you knew it he had a multimillion-dollar business called Heyo which allowed it's users to create sophisticated Facebook marketing campaigns with an incredibly easy-to-understand interface. Despite having absolutely no experience or knowledge in the area or the startup space, this architecture student doubled down on his hustle and achieved what most entrepreneurs would kill for.

It's this attitude, along with some slick marketing chops, that has allowed Latka to achieve all the success he has today.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to start thinking more creatively as an entrepreneur
  • The best way you can attract and work with top-level influencers
  • Different ways you can start selling even if you have no product
  • The power of the webinar and how to harness it
  • His personal growth hacking techniques and sales process
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP097_Nathan_Latka.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:32am AEDT

In the late 1960s, when Kenneth "Hap" Klopp traded in his corporate aspirations for the life of an entrepreneur, the support network for such endeavors was not nearly what it is today. But Klopp knew he had what it took to run a successful company, and he was right.

After taking over from co-founders Douglas and Susie Tompkins in 1968, Klopp spent the following 20 years as CEO using pre-Internet disruption and brand-building wizardry to turn The North Face into a global outdoor gear brand. Under his leadership, the company played a role in the growth of the outdoor recreation industry itself, and his journey as an entrepreneur is full of timeless wisdom that only comes from decades in the trenches.

Klopp got his start when he took over the family business, following the death of his father, while finishing his undergraduate degree at Stanford. He then went on to complete his MBA while orchestrating the sale of the company. After graduation, he went out to interview for positions, only to find that no one was willing to hire him to run something—they all wanted him to start at the bottom and work his way up— which sounded pretty boring.

Hap’s focus was on consumer goods, marketing, sales and branding, which landed him an interview at Proctor and Gamble. During the course of the interview, he was introduced to the corporate mores that have pushed so many of us to pursue the life of an entrepreneur. In short, P&G expected each employee to wear a white shirt and tie every day, to refrain from the use of nicknames and to dutifully mind their post until an opportunity for advancement was presented. It was settled, Klopp was not cut out to work for anyone else. “I didn’t want any part of it…I didn’t fit into to it.” 

As we know, it’s not enough to simply want to break free from the corporate world—you must have a plan or at least a product. Klopp decided to pursue his passion for the great outdoors and acquired The North Face, at the time just two stores in Northern California beloved by a devoted niche of climbers and otherwise outdoorsy folks.

In this interview you will learn:

  • The importance of making quality a part of your brand
  • How to grow and manage a team of over a thousand employees
  • How to use the power of storytelling
  • How to build your brand into a globally recognized one
  • How to overcome the challenges that life throws at you
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP096_Hap_Klopp.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:05am AEDT

Dubbed "the world's most powerful startup incubator" by Fast Company, Y Combinator (YC) has been plucking startups from garages, dorm rooms, coffee shops, and assorted founder hangouts for over a decade.

With a combined valuation of more than $65 billion among its alumni, a list that reads like a who’s who of startup fame—think AirBNB, Reddit, Dropbox, Instacart, Scribd, Weebly—YC has become a Silicon Valley institution. It is described as an elite founders boot camp, a place where ideas are incubated, annihilated, refined, and polished for a period of three months, ready to be served up to a bevy of hungry investors.

As co-founder of this entrepreneurial playground, Jessica Livingston has seen it all: the tears, the tantrums, and the triumphs, while getting a bird’s eye view of some of the startup world’s biggest success stories.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to close the gap between a failed startup and a wildly successful one
  • What Y Combinator is looking for when they take on new startups
  • The exact process that Y Combinator puts startups through in order to ensure success
  • The key traits and qualities shared by ever successful founder
  • What signs to look out for that your startup may be doomed
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP095_Jessica_Livingston.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:52am AEDT

All entrepreneurs and startups are underdogs in one way or another. After all, in order to be an entrepreneur you're already going against the grain, and in order to be successful you must be willing to challenge the status quo no matter how large or small.

But it's not everyday you find someone who manages to completely disrupt a billion-dollar industry with nothing more than a blog, some hustle, and a keen sense for marketing.

In this modern day tale of David and Goliath, we speak with Alborz Fallah, who armed only with a blog managed to take on the centuries-old automotive industry and come out on top. Today his blog brings in millions of dollars in advertising revenue and challenges some of the biggest media companies in the world.

But it didn't happen overnight. It took some grit and a great understanding of marketing and branding to get to where he is today. Something that he readily shares with us in today's interview.

In this week's episode you will learn:

  • Tips on finding the right audience and niche for your product
  • All you'll ever need to know on how to successfully build your brand through trust and customer satisfaction
  • What it means to have a good reputation in your industry
  • Where to go when you're looking for resources to grow your company
  • The best way to foster your brand's community
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP094_Alborz_Fallah.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:50am AEDT

To be a great entrepreneur, you need to have a great vision. Case in point:

Back in the 80s, we were just entering the internet age. At the time, it didn't really exist beyond a few government think tanks and laboratories, and we were only just beginning to understand what was possible. It was during that time that massive companies like IBM, Sears, Microsoft and Citigroup began investing millions of dollars into figuring out this internet business.

Despite all of the competition, in 1985, Steve Case and the team behind a fledgling startup named AOL rolled up their sleeves and helped shaped the internet into what we know it as today.

"When we started AOL in the United States, only 3% of people were online and those 3% were online only one hour a week. So it really was early days in terms of, it was still a niche hobbyist kind of market. I believed that someday it'd be a mass market, someday it'd be a mainstream market, someday it'd change how people got information, communicate, bought products and so forth."

It was that vision that they were building something for tomorrow that turned AOL from a small startup into the giant we know it as today.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Why focusing on community is the best move a startup can make
  • How to build for the future instead of building for what's happening today
  • What it means to develop curiosity and why you need it to be a successful entrepreneur
  • Exclusive insight into the early days of AOL and how they built a global brand
  • How Steve judges a startup's disruptive potential when looking to invest
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP093_Steve_Case.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:23am AEDT

One of the greatest misconceptions you'll encounter in the startup world is the one about age. You'll hear would-be entrepreneurs constantly telling themselves that they're too young, or that they're too old, or that they're just waiting for that right moment to finally become an entrepreneur.

That's ridiculous.

There is no perfect moment waiting around the corner for you, because the perfect moment only comes to those who actually go out there and create it.

Ben Chaib, founder of Sell and Succeed, is the perfect example of that. After working in the corporate world for 25 years, he decided that enough was enough. He had the skills and ability to generate millions in revenue, but he wasn't getting the return that we wanted. So he set out and created his own business, and today he's consulting hundreds of other aspiring entrepreneurs on how to market for success.

"We are great at doing things for others, but we are not great at doing it for ourselves. But we deserve it more than others," he says.

While relatively new to entrepreneurship, Ben is no slouch when it comes to knowing how to make a business work.

In our interview with Ben, we get invaluable insight from one of the top business coaches in the world as he breaks down his sales process and shows us what it means to be a great marketer.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Ben's 8-step process of marketing and making sales
  • The advantages of having a business coach and good mentors to help you start your own business
  • Tips on how to make a sales process that is authentically you
  • How to find clients and target audiences through Facebook marketing
  • Why you need to get your customers to connect and feel comfortable talking about their business with you
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP092_Ben_Chaib.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:52am AEDT

As the dominance of technology keeps on gaining steam, some non-techy, would-be entrepreneurs are made to feel discouraged. How can they compete with all the slick coders starting businesses in this virtual world?

That didn’t stop non-coder Brian Moran from making serious money online, and ultimately making it big in the competitive niche of Software as a Service (SaaS).

No programming geek, Moran was a marketing major, but primarily a baseball player, in college. He had hoped to continue his baseball career after graduating, but an injury forced him out of the ballpark and into the office.

His office job was stable, well-paid, low-stress … and intolerable.

“I was just bored out of my mind. I was getting paid well, great benefits, I had just gotten married,” says Moran. “But someone else was controlling every aspect of my life.”

Six years and a newborn later, Moran is now the founder of the successful SamCart checkout service, which counts Foundr as one of its many customers. In the time between, Moran was consistently hitting it out of the park with multiple online businesses.

Get ready, Moran’s story isn’t your average ball game.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to build a SaaS company even if you don't have the technical skills
  • The 7 key elements of a checkout page that actually converts
  • Brian's marketing tactics that's led him to build multiple successful companies
  • What you need to make it as an SaaS startup
  • How to reduce churn and create loyal customers for life
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP091_Brian_Moran.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:47am AEDT

The closest thing Ankur Nagpal has ever had to a job was a summer internship at Amazon when he was 18. Ever since then, he's been his own boss at companies that he's built. Outside of that brief fling as an employee, Nagpal has wholly dedicated his life to being a serial entrepreneur.

In his early years as an entrepreneur, he entered the highly competitive startup scene in Silicon Valley as a very successful Facebook app developer. Only he didn't make individual apps. Instead what he was selling was the platform that everyone used to create their own apps. From there, he bowed out with a cool seven figures to his name when that company had run its course.

Just as the real winners of the gold rush weren't those who found gold but the entrepreneurs who sold the tools, Nagpal has made a living as the one people turn to when they're looking for development tools.

Fast-forward to today and he is now the founder and CEO of Teachable, a business that teaches and trains other entrepreneurs on how to create their own online courses with his easy-to-use platform and teaching methods. What once started as a fun side project has now turned into a multimillion-dollar business with more than a million students!

With years of experience in the startup capital of the world, Ankur lets us in on how he became the powerhouse entrepreneur he is today.

In this interview you will learn:

  • What to do to turn your side project into business succcess
  • The things you need to know about creating a successful online course
  • How to create a successful business based on empowering others
  • Tips to finding paying customers if you've just launched
  • Where to go to find the best investor for you and what that means
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP090_Ankur_Nagpal.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:37am AEDT

Brene Brown was a meandering youth in her 20s, doing more traveling and bartending than she was building a business or focusing on school. As a result, she didn't graduate college until she was 30. Nonetheless, after finishing her bachelor’s in social work, she quickly gained her masters and PhD and started a career as an academic at the University of Houston.

But something was rustling beneath the surface for Brown—being a quiet academic and publishing papers wasn’t enough for her. That something was entrepreneurship. Brene Brown started publishing books and doing talks and coaching for executives and successful entrepreneurs.

But Brown is best known for her unique message, calling for entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs alike to open their hearts and minds to vulnerability. What many avoid and even look down upon, Brene Brown insists is a key to success, real intimacy, and happiness.

Brown is a thought leader of our time. In an entrepreneurship community dominated by masculine values and "tough guy" attitudes, she breaks the noise with her message to accept and even embrance discomfort. And she isn’t just preaching: throughout her works, and her now famous TEDx talk, Brown exposes her own vulnerability. This refreshing, data-based take on life and success has resonated with millions of people who have watched her TED Talk, and the many successful entrepreneurs she currently works with. It also informs the way she runs her own business, and was in full display during her interview with Foundr.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Why vulnerability doesn't have to be a weakness and how you can turn it into your strongest weapon
  • Where to find the strength to get back up when you've fallen further than ever before
  • The right way to deal with all the pressures of being an entrepreneur
  • How to take the data you have and turn it into a profitable business
  • What it truly means to be vulnerable
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP089_Brene_Brown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:30am AEDT

As the son of hardworking immigrants, David Cancel saw his parents working seven days a week to support their family. As an adult, he realized that not all people worked the way his parents did, which sparked in him a desire to make a living without getting a “job.”

Cancel always knew that he wanted to be an entrepreneur, even if he wasn’t quite sure what that meant. As a kid, he found that flipping through the pages of Inc. Magazine and other early entrepreneurial publications didn’t offer much insight. He saw ads for get-rich-quick schemes and stories of businessmen who had reached amazing heights. Although he wasn’t quite sure what it meant to be an entrepreneur, he knew he wanted in.

The term “serial entrepreneur” gets thrown around a lot, but few have lived a life that defines it as well as David Cancel. Building and selling companies has become a way of life; his obsessions around ideas or problems quickly snowball into companies. He has started and exited five companies in the past 16 years and is currently an advisor, investor, and/or consultant to several more, including BigCommerce, HelpScout, Rapportive, and Yieldbot.

In this interview you will learn:

  • What it takes to create a successful product
  • How to listen to your customer and what you can learn from it
  • What kind of feedback you should listen to and what you should ignore
  • The secret to iterating effectively and how you can start improving your own products
  • Where to find the right audience and what it means to serve them
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP088_David_Cancel.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:32am AEDT

Justin Kan doesn’t come off as the type who lives for the spotlight. Which is funny, because at one point he live-streamed his life, 24/7 for the whole world to see, for months.

That may seem like an unlikely path to a billion-dollar sale, but in fact, the early experiment in the world of live video got Kan and his partner Emmett Shear part of the way there. That unconventional level of dedication and curiosity is a testament to how these two have been willing to dive into the opportunities before them, leading them through a flurry of tech business successes.

Kan’s CV speaks for itself: He co-founded hit companies Twitch, Justin.tv, Socialcam, Exec, and is now a partner at startup incubator Y Combinator, which invests millions annually into tech companies.

A native of Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, Kan was not an obvious candidate for someone who would succeed in tech. He has a certain natural charisma, but studied physics and philosophy at Yale, neither of which is necessarily a match for a career in startups. However, he received a crash course in entrepreneurship from an early age by watching his mother run her own real estate business, and it seems to have stuck.

From there, Kan experienced his share of losses and ridiculously spectacular wins, developing a series of products that define the chapters of his fascinating career in tech startups.

In this interview you will learn:

  • The exact process of coming up with, developing and selling your startup idea
  • When to pivot and the signs to look out for
  • What startup accelerators like Y Combinator are looking out for
  • How to hustle harder than everyone else around you and gain the competitive advantage
  • Why you should bet on the founders and not the startup itself and the wins that come with it
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP087_Justin_Kan.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:25pm AEDT

From a very young age, it was clear that selling was encoded in Gary Tramer’s DNA.

His aptitude for sales emerged early when he was a scrappy little kid riding his bike around the neighborhood with his friends. He and his gang would steal their neighbors’ plants, re-pot them into yogurt containers, and sell them back to the same neighbors. With the money they made, Tramer and company would indulge in Fizz Wiz, Warheads, and other junk from the candy shop.

“We were crafting our humble entrepreneurial beginnings,” Tramer says.

From these humble beginnings, Tramer has evolved to start and run several successful sales-focused businesses, up to today’s LeadChat company, where revenues reach over $1 million. He’s become a true master, with roots in face-to-face selling that he adapted and scaled up using cutting-edge digital tools. And he dished all of his secrets for us in this interview.

In this interview you will learn:

  • From start to finish, what goes into making and closing leads
  • Dozens of helpful tools you can start using today for your own sales strategy
  • The different ways you can test your ads without breaking the bank
  • The process of utilizing traditional marketing techniques in a digital setting
  • What it takes to train your salespeople with no experience into becoming absolute sales machines
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP086_Gary_Tramer.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:08am AEDT

“Lean Startup” has become a popular concept in the world of entrepreneurship. All founders and founders-to-be have phrases like “pivot” and “fail fast” on the tips of their tongues.

But for Martin Hosking, lean isn’t just a fashionable trend. He’s lived it. And after applying and experiencing lean methods over decades of launching and running tech startups, the methodology has gained a more sophisticated meaning in Hosking’s mind. It is not just a clever strategy for testing markets, but rather staying nimble to truly fulfill the needs of the customer, something that drives him today.

“What I really like about lean is it puts the customer at the center,” Hosking says, adding a caveat. “You need to have lean, but you need to have a good strategic orientation. The customer doesn’t always know what they want."

Hosking’s nuanced understanding of lean startup methodology highlights the deep expertise he’s developed over the course his career. And it’s paid off. After experiencing more than his share of 1990s dot-com boom and bust, Hosking is now CEO of Redbubble, an Etsy-like online marketplace for artists that’s become highly successful.

But as any successful entrepreneur will tell you, it’s not just smarts and experience that get you there.

Passion is the vital ingredient that needs to be present to keep a company going during the hard times and bring it out of the shadows to phenomenal success. It’s a kind of passion that can’t be reeled in or held back. It comes out immediately when you meet a true entrepreneur. Martin Hosking is a prime example; the passion and dedication he has for his work spills out from his fast and excited manner of speaking.

In this interview you will learn:

  • What it really means to go lean and how to get there
  • The secrets to developing a passionate group of users
  • How to be prepared when the unexpected arises
  • The processes that Martin goes through in order to make sure that his business is always running in top shape
  • What goes into building a successful online business
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP085_Martin_Hosking.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:17am AEDT

As a full time software developer working for a large company, Rob Walling dreamt of becoming an entrepreneur – and more than a decade later he has obtained serial entrepreneur status.

Rob Walling is many things…as a serial entrepreneur he has been at the helm of several tech companies including Drip, Micropreneur, HitTail and DotNetNovice. His personal brand is supported by regular posts to his blog which he forayed into a book, Start Small and Stay Small: A Developer’s Guide to Launching a Startup. In his spare time, he wears the hat of a podcaster, conference host, teacher, angel investor and audio book junkie.

When the entrepreneurial itch first infiltrated Rob’s being, he left his full time job and began consulting and freelancing. The move was great at first but he soon found that freelancing and consulting was a lot like working for someone else – which was seriously uncool.

His new dream was products – build something that people will buy on his own terms without the watchful gaze of a boss. But, it didn’t work like that…instead; Rob’s second transition came when he acquired a small software application and tasted true freedom. As Rob puts it, “My goal was to cobble together enough of a portfolio so that I could stop consulting.”

His acquisitions ran the gamut from a site that sold beach towels (but ranked high on Google) to a book on bonsai trees but eventually, he was able to give up consulting completely. He developed a strategy built on incremental progress - a solid stair stepping approach that has made every acquisition, his biggest acquisition.

In this interview you will learn:

  • What to do when you want to bootstrap and how to make it work
  • The secrets to keeping yourself in check and managing expectations
  • The secrets to self-confidence in the startup world
  • How to build yourself a top mastermind group
  • What it takes to ensure that you have a proven product that people will love
  • &  much more!
Direct download: FP084_Rob_Walling.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:14am AEDT

It's not easy to admit when you're wrong, but you'll rarely find a better time than when you're filing for personal bankruptcy.

That's what Tim Fargo of Tweet Jukebox had to do when he was a young man in 1991 and found himself a little too in over his head. But today he's the founder of one of the most exciting and innovative social media automation engines in the world, right after selling his previous company for $20 million.

So how does someone go from bankruptcy to $20 million?

Well you do it by paying attention and learning from your mistakes, which is exactly why Tim is where he is today. He's experienced both the lowest and highest points any entrepreneur can go through and he's walked away a better businessman and all the wiser for it.

We're very lucky to share with you today this episode of the Foundr podcast, in which he talks openly about the lessons he's learned throughout his career and all the different pitfalls and traps you need to avoid.

If you ever wanted to learn from someone with over 25 years of highs and lows in the world of entrepreneurship, you don't want to miss this one.

In this interview you will learn:

  • What it's like to file for bankruptcy and how to recover from it
  • The do's and dont's of cash flow management
  • How to keep yourself in check and on the right track when starting a business
  • The key steps to growing your business rapidly
  • What you can learn from going broke
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP083_Tim_Fargo.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:37am AEDT

Gary Vaynerchuk is a bona fide Internet celebrity. At last count, he was sitting pretty at 1.21 million Twitter followers, and 226,000 Instagram followers. He’s appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Time Magazine, on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Conan O’Brien, Ellen, CNN, and MSNBC. He’s now the CEO of VaynerMedia, a digital agency with more than 600 staff. Vaynerchuk is an entrepreneur, investor, New York Times best-selling author, speaker, and, hailing from greater New York City, a fervent Jets fan.

But his success all started with Wine Library TV, a video blog he started when YouTube was still a 1-year-old Internet debutante. From the start of his career, Vaynerchuk has mastered social media to draw attention to his online persona GaryVee, and since then has leveraged his fame to build success with over a decade of shrewd planning and execution. But there’s one secret to success that Vaynerchuk always comes back to.

“The reason that I’m speaking to you is that I’ve worked harder than you.”

These brazen words were uttered by Vaynerchuk during one of his many training videos. While it’s impossible to know just how true that is, this is a belief central to Vaynerchuk’s life. Hard work is everything.

When discussing his success, the word hustle frequently bobs to the surface. “My hustle is better than everybody else’s,” he says, “so I have to bet on it. I bet on my strengths.” And despite living in an age of lifehacks and shortcuts, Vaynerchuk remains a staunch advocate of simple hard work. Armed with little more than his ball-of-fire personality and a will to succeed, he’s built an attention-hungry business empire worth millions.

In this interview you will learn:

  • The best strategies to leverage social media for your business
  • What to look out for when it comes to creating the perfect social media strategy
  • The secrets to creating valuable content and why it works
  • How to take care of your employees and build long-lasting and loyal relationships
  • The secrets behind each social media platform and how to take advantage of each one
  • & much more!

This podcast episode was brought to you by FreshBooks.

When it comes to finding the perfect service to help you manage and track your invoices, time and expenses then you can't go past FreshBooks. Designed for the small businesses and entrepreneurs who don't need full-blown double-entry programming but still want to keep their finances in check, you can't go back once you start using it!

Better yet, FreshBooks is offering a month of unrestricted use to all of Foundr listeners ­ totally free right now and you don’t need a credit card for the trial!

To claim your free month, go to FreshBooks.com/FoundrMag and enter FoundrMag in the “How Did You Hear About Us?” section to get started today!

Direct download: FP082_Gary_Vaynerchuck.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:08am AEDT

Every day there’s an entrepreneur out there who believes that they’ve found the golden ticket. The one idea that is so revolutionary that it’s going to change the landscape of their niche and bring them huge success.

Unfortunately, no matter how great of an idea it may be, nothing happens unless you have a brilliant plan to execute it.

So where to start in this crazy startup world?

Well, according to Greta Rose Van Riel, it starts off with finding not just the right product idea but the perfect one. By using a bit of research, and a little bit more patience, she was able to find the type of product that took her to over 600k in revenue in just under a year!

By utilising Instagram she managed to spread her brand’s message and exposure, growing to over 15 million followers in just a few years! It is very rare you’ll find anyone else as savvy as the founder of SkinnyMe Tea when it comes to the world of e-commerce.

In this interview with Foundr Greta breaks down for us the nitty gritty details of the e-commerce world and shows us just what it takes to make it as a 21st century entrepreneur.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Learn the easiest and cheapest way to build a website for your business
  • Important Insights on how to use Instagram to help start, grow and build up your brand account
  • Learn how to identify trends and physical products that you can successfully sell online
  • How to get your perfect funnel for you to start selling immediately
  • The do's and don'ts of E-commerce

& much more!

Direct download: FP081_Greta_Rose_Van_Riel.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:56pm AEDT

One type of entrepreneur we don't give enough credit to is the local business owner. While it seems that everyone in the startup world these days is trying to come up with the latest app, or next revolutionary SaaS, we often forget about that entrepreneur looking to create something on the ground.

One of the biggest struggles for local business owners is finding a way to get their business out there. When you're running a brick-and-mortar business it can often feel like your options are limited when it comes to marketing and brand exposure.

Ramy Georgy is about to change to way you think about local business.

Ramy is a local dentist in Foundr's home base of Melbourne, Australia and today he runs one of Australia's most recognized and sought-after teeth-whitening clinics. The most impressive part? He achieved all of this within his first year of operation.

By thinking creatively and using the power of Instagram and celebrity influence, Ramy has managed to turn his local business into an international one, proving once and for all that traditional and digital businesses don't have to live in separate worlds. In fact, when used together, you can produce some phenomenal results.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How Instagram works in turning your followers into actual clients for a local business
  • Tips on how to sell your local product and increase your business internationally at the same
  • The importance of having influencers on your side when taking on the global market
  • Ways to start a business and be recognized in the dental industry
  • Tips on choosing the right influencers to work with
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP080_Ramy_Georgy.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:31am AEDT

One common trait among successful entrepreneurs is a sense of urgency—spotting a need and responding without hesitation in order to address and capitalize on it, even when that means taking a risk.

Deonna Monique is a prime example. As a consumer of hair extensions, she had long struggled with finding the right product, and what she saw as a lack of authenticity in the market. But when she realized through social media that the problem was much bigger than her own, she started a company.

“I thought I was on to something,” Monique tells Foundr. “So a week after I opened my business, I quit my job. I just went for it.”

Despite some serious tests of faith along the way, Monique stuck with her company Boho Exotic Studio, and ended up earning seven figures in that first year, she says. Now approaching three years in business, and she has a strong foothold, all with her chief channel of marketing being social media platforms like Instagram.

Monique’s lack of hesitation, no-nonsense approach to connecting with her customers, and faith in the quality of her product and service, have added up to a stunningly fast ascent, all in the face of serious business and personal hurdles.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to let your customer be the face of your company
  • What to do when it feels like you've hit rock bottom as an entrepreneur
  • The best ways to hack social media marketing to further your brand and grow your audience
  • The perils and benefits of diving straight into building a business as a new entrepreneur
  • The importance of looking past all the doubters and believing in yourself and your dreams
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP079_Deonna_Monique.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:32am AEDT

No matter how you crunch the numbers, starting your own business is expensive.

In fact one of the first crossroads moments you'll encounter as an entrepreneur, among many, is trying to figure where you're going to get that funding. Do you self-invest and bootstrap it? Or do you start talking to investors?

Raj Sheth goes deep on that issue in our interview today, as he openly talks about how he and his co-founders funded their way to the top with Recruiterbox.

Nearly five years since its launch, Recruiterbox is used by more than 1,500 customers, with next-level businesses like Groupon, Couchsurfing, and Crunchbase praising the SaaS that Sheth has created.

In one of our most insightful interviews to date, Sheth talks about the lessons he's learned throughout his entrepreneurial journey, from being the founder of two failed startups, to using SEO as a source of customer acquisition.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Bootstrapping 101: How to start a software business on a tight budget
  • The importance of having a well-rounded founding team
  • Do's and don'ts of building any kind of software product
  • Top strategies on how to utilise SEO with the right kind of content
  • What to do to get your name out there and have top-level influencers and companies use your platform
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP078_Raj_Sheth.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:13am AEDT

In just a few short years Steve Kamb has successfully created a multimillion dollar business by orchestrating one of the most intriguing communities online.

As the founder of Nerd Fitness Kamb has positively influenced and empowered thousands of people in the world into living a healthier lifestyle. By looking past the stereotypes and the norm, Kamb has managed to break through the highly competitive fitness market and find a niche that was looking for the answer that only he could provide.

However the key to his success?

Being able to speak the language of his target market, in this case geeks and nerds. The average joes and desk jockeys who want to look like Captain America but aren't sure where to start.

By putting his community first and realising that there's more to fitness than the latest bodyweight exercise, or the different flavours of protein, Kamb has managed to gamify fitness and, in doing so, win the loyalty of every member of his community.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to start a multimillion dollar business in the online fitness industry
  • Strategies on writing successful articles to target a specific market of readers and culture
  • Not only the importance of an engaged community but the secrets to building one
  • Ideas on how to start on writing and publishing your own self-help book
  • Important health tips for the busy entrepreneur
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP077_Steve_Kamb.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:13am AEDT

Finding the right startup idea is difficult even for lifelong entrepreneurs. But when it comes down to it, the best approach is to take a long hard look at what you're passionate about and try to figure out a way to share that with the world.

By sharing her passion for graphic design to anyone who was interested, Melanie Perkins was able to become a certified tour de force in the entrepreneurial world.

Seemingly coming out of nowhere, in just under two years her company has grown to 8 million users, is now valued at $233 million dollars, and has the backing of heavyweight investors like Guy Kawasaki, Bill Tai, and Lars Rasmussen, just to name a few.

As the CEO and founder of Canva, Perkins knew that everyone had a little bit of an artist's streak inside them. The trouble was, the tools to bring that out were either too expensive or too clunky to learn. So she did what every good entrepreneur does. She made a product that took the complex and made it simple.

Responding to the rapid expansion of social media and the growing importance of being able to communicate visually, Perkins has made it possible for anyone to pick up her product and start making visually striking images.

With an eye for even loftier heights along with her keen eye for design, Perkins shares with us her lessons on how to turn your passion into a multi-million dollar success story.

In this interview you will learn:

  • The tools that you need to kickstart your own graphics design company
  • The importance of finding and empowering the right people on your team for maximum results
  • Why you need to fundamentally believe in what you're trying to achieve with your startup
  • How to get people to use your platform and software in a crowded market
  • What you need to do develop your team's focus, decision making, and leadership skills so your business works for you
  • & much more.

 

Direct download: FP076_Mel_Perkins.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:11pm AEDT

For some, being an entrepreneur is the only life to live, and it means essentially not having a job. For others, working for yourself, always hustling and without a dependable paycheck, sounds insane.

Today's guest is firmly in the former camp, and very proud to say that he's never had a job in his life. There have been some part-time gigs, some casual work here and there, but Yaro Starak has only ever seen one side of the fence, and it's always been green.

While there are those out there who will insist that you're unlikely to turn your passion or hobby into a successful business, they've never met Starak, the quintessential lifestyle entrepreneur. Armed with a truly entrepreneurial spirit, Starak has managed to turn almost each and every one of his hobbies into an immensely profitable business.

While it may be impressive to say that you've made it big in the e-commerce field, it's truly impressive if you can say you've been doing it for more than 10 years!

As one of the original dot-com entrepreneurs, Starak has made a living working from nothing but just a laptop and an Internet connection. While others crashed when the market folded, Starak simply adapted.

But the one constant throughout his experiences with e-commerce has been the power of blogging. With his blog, Starak has generated millions of dollars in revenue whether sitting at home or traveling the world.

And here's how he did it.

In this interview you will learn:

  • Everything you ever needed to know about the importance and power behind blogging in the e-commerce world
  • What to look for when you want to capitalize on any niche
  • How to quickly grow and monetize your email list
  • The ins and outs of internet marketing and how to crush it
  • Secrets being building an epic sales funnel online
  • & much more!
Direct download: FP075_Yaro_Starak.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:12am AEDT

Anyone can have a great idea, any entrepreneur can get lucky and make it big, but it takes something really special to turn your startup into something that lasts.

For the past 27 years that's exactly what Darrell Wade has done with IntrepidTravel. It all started in 1988 when two friends went on a trip to Africa and came back with an idea, something that would revolutionize the travel industry forever.

Despite the lack of confidence from the banks and everyone telling them otherwise, Wade and his cofounder knew that there was a market being underserviced out there. So channeling his own passion for traveling, he created a startup where, for more than four years, his salary was only a third of his previous job.

Since then, IntrepidTravel has turned into a $300 million business and has successfully transported 350,000 travelers around the globe in the previous year alone!

Despite hardships, Wade vigorously reinvested back into his business, focusing on building the best product he could possibly offer, and creating a company with staying power to support it all.

Today IntrepidTravel is one of the premiere travel agencies in the world and it all started with a passion and desire to change.

In this episode you will learn:

  • How to start a business in the travel industry

  • How to make your business grow on a tight budget and learn about the risks that you have to take for your startup travelling business

  • The advantages of re-investing to make your business grow

  • Unique ideas and Actions items to get a lot of travellers book with your agency

  • The importance of mutual respect when it comes to leadership and your organization

  • How to identify the leverage points where you can scale up in your business

  • & much more!
Direct download: FP074_Darrell_Wade.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:24pm AEDT

There is a quintessential moment that every entrepreneur will face at some point in his or her life. It doesn’t matter what kind of business you’re running, or what kind of niche you’re in, there's a particular experience unique to those who dare to try their hands at entrepreneurship.

It’s the moment when you look in the mirror and realize that you’re not happy doing whatever it is you’re doing. You decide that the system doesn’t work for you, so instead you’re going to go out there and create something for yourself.

For John Lee Dumas of Entrepreneur on Fire, that didn’t happen until he was 32 years old.

“I gave myself my own job and that's what I kind of love about it, because I've been asking, begging, pleading for jobs really for the first 32 years of my life,” Dumas says. “I said, ‘You know what? It's time to get out there and create my own job, a job that I want, that I'm actually excited and passionate about.’”

You’ll likely know Dumas as the founder and host of Entrepreneur on Fire, a podcast in which, for the past four years, he’s been interviewing the top entrepreneurs in the world and in the process building a multimillion dollar business.

Today, Entrepreneur on Fire boasts 1.3 million listens a month, making it one of the most popular business podcasts in the world. But it took more than 10 years of trial and error for Dumas to get to where he is today.

In this interview you will learn:

  • How to create a business podcast from scratch.
  • The importance of seeking out courses and communities that will teach you what you want to learn.
  • Learn how to take methods and strategies from experienced entrepreneurs and learn what works for you.
  • Why it is good to be authentic and transparent as possible to your podcast audience.
  • Learn about the marketing concept on how to build and retain a loyal audience and following.
Direct download: FP073_John_Lee_Dumas.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:10am AEDT

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