Foundr Magazine Podcast with Nathan Chan

From working as a server at Longhorn Steakhouse, to multiple successful startups, making millions in his 20s, to publishing a best selling book, Daniel DiPiazza knows the entrepreneur's journey like the back of his hand. Here to discuss his upcoming "Start Your Side Hustle" course with Foundr, Daniel is all too familiar with the challenges and doubts faced by today's hustlers, and is here to teach you ways to overcome them.

If you want to start a business but don't know where to begin, a low-risk side hustle by freelancing with your existing skills really is the gateway to entrepreneurship. It's extremely affordable with almost literally zero startup cost. In return, you can expect to make great profits with little to no overheads.

Daniel has done this multiple times and has a unique method for helping you identify your skills, find clients, and getting them to pay you for your service.

If there's any other type of content you'd like to see that would be valuable to you during this time, please don't hesitate to reach out to us via email.

Key Takeaways

  • Daniel discusses his first viral article: Hacking E-Lance, the infamous "butterball story," and how he dominated a job board website
  • Taking the first step towards starting your own business with "sweat equity"
  • Why service-based businesses are the gateway drug to entrepreneurship
  • Why freelancing teaches you all the business essentials
  • Taking the first step; how not to be afraid, what to focus on, and what the competition means for you
  • The importance of building a skill inventory, defining your skill, and seeing where they align
  • Gaining confidence in becoming an entrepreneur and why you don't have to be the best in the world at what you do
  • The fastest way for you to get paid for your big idea
Direct download: FP317_Daniel_DiPiazza.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:00am AEDT

Ben Horowitz is one of the most widely recognized names in the world of entrepreneurship. Not only is he the co-founder of the famous venture capital fund, Andreessen Horowitz, but he's also a respected author and thinker with some of the most innovative ideas when it comes to the way companies are run.

In our conversation with Horowitz, we dive deep into the topic of culture—how to create it, move it, and adhere to it. Horowitz also gives us a glimpse into his book, What You Do Is Who You Are, and shares fascinating stories and case studies from it (such as his learnings from prison gang leader, Shaka Senghor).

This isn't a podcast episode you want to miss! Whether you're a fan of Horowitz himself or simply want to learn more about the art of crafting a company culture, you're sure to gain tons of insights in this interview.

If there's any other type of content you'd like to see that would be valuable to you during this time, please don't hesitate to reach out to us via email.

Key Takeaways

  • The problem that Andreessen Horowitz set out to solve for technical founders 
  • What compelled Horowitz to publish his book, What You Do Is Who You Are
  • What it takes to move a culture 
  • The importance of cohesion between culture and strategy
  • Why you don’t need to establish your company culture on Day 1
  • What a prison gang leader taught Horowitz about culture and leadership
  • The creative way that Andreessen Horowitz enforces their value to be respectful to entrepreneurs at the firm
  • Horowitz’s thoughts on the culture of Netflix versus McDonald’s  
  • The elements that go into creating a high-performance culture 
  • Differentiating between high performance versus long hours 
  • Why Horowitz looks for courage in founders 
  • Bonus: Horowitz shares his favorite rap album from 2019
Direct download: FP316_Ben_Horowitz.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:00am AEDT

In 2008, Jeff Rosenthal and his co-founders Elliott Bisnow and Brett Leve convinced 19 people they admired to go on a ski trip with them to Park City, Utah. They wanted to spend one-on-one time with this small group of thought leaders to learn from them and glean some knowledge.

Little did they know that this was only the beginning of their long and successful entrepreneurial journey. What started off as a small event production company has morphed into a global behemoth that includes everything from nonprofits to funds to a major ski resort that all fall under the Summit brand.

While the company is still primarily known for its famous invitation-only events, its biggest impact is its tight-knit community of innovative, creative individuals from around the world.

In this podcast episode, Rosenthal talks about Summit’s explosive growth, what it takes to host a truly extraordinary event, and more entrepreneurial gold.

If there’s any other type of content you’d like to see that would be valuable to you during this time, please don’t hesitate to reach out at support@foundr.com.


Key Takeaways

  • What inspired Rosenthal and his co-founders to start their event production company Summit in 2008
  • How Summit expanded into a family of companies, nonprofits, and funds over the last 12 years
  • What makes a spectacular event, according to Rosenthal
  • Why Rosenthal believes “keep it real” is terrible advice when it comes to events, and what he recommends instead
  • The importance of leadership when it comes to event planning
  • The correlation between creativity and capital
  • How Rosenthal manages to lead the multiple entities under Summit
  • The best advice on delegation Rosenthal received from his mentor
  • Why profitability isn’t the only measure of an event’s success
  • What it takes to attract top-notch speakers (and how to set them up for success)
  • The way Rosenthal approaches balancing quality of experience and scaling
Direct download: FP315_Jeff_Rosenthal.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:12am AEDT

When Tiffany Masterson was a stay-at-home mom, she was always looking for ways to make a little extra money. So when the opportunity came around to start selling a brand of bar cleanser as a side hustle, she didn’t think much of it.

Little did she know that she would soon develop a passion for skincare, cultivate her own philosophy around what skincare should look like, and launch Drunk Elephant—a brand that was eventually sold to Shiseido in 2019 for a whopping $845 million.

In this podcast episode, Masterson takes us through her unexpected journey as an entrepreneur—from having her brother-in-law as her first investor to snagging a partnership with Sephora, to building an incredible company culture.

If there’s any other type of content you’d like to see that would be valuable to you during this time, please don’t hesitate to reach out at support@foundr.com.


Key Takeaways

  • How Masterson, a stay-at-home mom of four children, started selling bar cleanser as a side hustle
  • Why she developed a fascination with the world of skincare
  • Masterson’s skincare philosophy, and how she started to create her dream product on paper
  • What it was like to have her brother-in-law as her first investor
  • Why Masterson kept the launch of Drunk Elephant in 2013 as minimal as possible
  • How Drunk Elephant caught the eye of Sephora
  • The cost of formulating, producing, and packaging 5,000 units of six products
  • The tough financial conversations Masterson had to have
  • Why Masterson chose to take things day-by-day instead of looking too far into the future
  • The biggest trap Masterson believes most founders fall into
  • How Masterson has kept her turnover rate at less than 2% since 2013
  • The reason why people get excited about the Drunk Elephant brand
  • Why Masterson doesn’t believe in trying to “outcompete” other brands
Direct download: FP314_Tiffany_Masterson.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:18am AEDT

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